14 Key Moves 14 Key Moves

14 Key Moves

Large scale regeneration programmes are complex and take time, but the benefits can be life changing.

We’re guided by our vision for Tāmaki as a place where everyone can flourish in an inclusive, affordable and vibrant community. Our master plan features 14 Key Moves that will collectively deliver our regeneration outcomes: creating social, economic and housing opportunities, in particular for our Māori and Pasifika Tāmaki whānau.

1.
CELEBRATING TĀMAKI WITH THE TĀMAKI LOOP

The planned Tāmaki Loop is a shared pedestrian and cycle route (approximately 11km long) that links Panmure to Glen Innes. It promotes healthy living and is a place for community activities such as the Tāmaki Fun Run and Matariki celebrations. Through co-design with the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board, mana whenua and the wider community, the Tāmaki Loop enables creative expression. It will bring te reo māori and the telling of the traditions and cultural associations valued by mana whenua to the fore through artworks and bi-lingual signage. The Loop will demonstrate Tāmaki tūrangawaewae (place of standing and sense of belonging).

So far, the Tāmaki Path forms the first part of the Loop which runs along the estuary from Panmure wharf to Wai O Taiki Nature Reserve. This was completed by the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board in 2019. Timing: to be delivered in sections over the next ten years. The first stage, linking the Tāmaki Path to Glen Innes town centre, will be completed within five years.

2.
UNLOCKING DENSITY

The Tāmaki Makaurau (Auckland city) housing landscape is changing as it transitions to higher density living. With the population growth in Auckland and shortage of quality homes, we’re responding to the need and helping more whānau into a new, healthy home. The regeneration programme enables us to increase the number of homes in Tāmaki through medium-density neighbourhoods. These are smaller than your average kiwi home, maximising land use. A higher concentration of homes, including apartments, will be focused around our town centres and local shops, transport hubs and bus routes, and close to reserves.

3.
PROMOTING LEADERSHIP PROJECTS

Several development sites have been identified as leadership projects. These will be used to demonstrate:
• Collaboration with mana whenua
• Building types
• Mix of uses
• Affordability
• Shift to public transport, walking, cycling / healthy living
• The way they connect with public spaces and other land uses
There are currently 14 vacant sites across the area, with three of these identified for leadership projects to include a multi-generational home for large families, housing fit for whānau who have children with special needs and need to live close to Sommerville Special School, and a trial site for prefabricated homes.

4.
MEETING DIVERSE HOUSING NEEDS

Tāmaki needs a variety of housing options so people from all walks of life can live within the area. Consideration will be given to innovation in both design and delivery. That means we will be delivering homes and neighbourhoods that will address cultural responsiveness; affordability; communal living; mixed use; accessibility and adaptive design.

5.
ENABLING A MODAL SHIFT TO WALKING, CYCLING AND PUBLIC TRANSPORT

Tāmaki needs sustainable transport choices to promote a healthy lifestyle. Moving away from car dependency and creating transport choices in Tāmaki will:
• Encourage sustainability by reducing car dependency
• Reduce the demand on existing roads in light of population increases
• Promote economic equality by offering people high quality, low-cost travel options
• Increase development efficiency by reducing the amount of land being used for car parking

6.
ACCESS TO PUBLIC TRANSPORT

Improving Tāmaki’s public transport network will give locals faster and more convenient access to bus and rail services, while supporting a shift away from car dependence. This could include increasing the frequency of buses and strategically placed bus stops and creating transport hubs to allow journeys that combine walking, public transport and / or cycling, as well as improving walking and cycling journeys.

7.
CREATING A NETWORK OF LIVING STREETS

Increased density means that people need more public space around them. Living streets create more public spaces for whānau to enjoy. The Living Streets Network approach promotes walking and cycling, whilst limiting vehicle movements. Faster, long distance traffic is focused on key routes while through traffic is reduced on living streets. This removes the danger and nuisance of fast and heavy traffic, while freeing up space for more public amenity.

8.
A TĀMAKI-UNIQUE WAYFINDING STRATEGY

Wayfinding is an opportunity to help people get around safely and easily, while adding character to their neighbourhoods. Successful wayfinding supports Living Streets and public transport systems and provides a unique opportunity to express creativity and cultural heritage. Tāmaki’s wayfinding will be graphically interesting and easy to read. It will provide clear navigational assistance and offers the opportunity for bilingual signage in (Te Reo Māori/English) and iwi and hapū narratives that express tradition and culture.

9.
DEVELOPING VIBRANT OPEN SPACES

It is important that open spaces in Tāmaki are well designed and support a range of amenities. This helps meet the increased demand for parks and reserves associated with higher density living. It also involves improvements to existing reserves including potential redistribution of open space.

10.
A CULTURALLY-INSPIRED LANDSCAPE

The planting strategy is to build on the green and leafy character of Tāmaki, reflecting the natural landscape as well as Tāmaki’s current diverse and vibrant community. The vision is for a green and native landscape that is uniquely Tāmaki, promoting native and sustainable plants. Plant species have been highly influenced by the cultural assessments produced by Tāmaki mana whenua.

11.
SUPPORTING LOCAL EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE

We have plans to help revitalise the Glen Innes and Panmure town centres to cater for the diverse community.

Glen Innes Town Centre

The key focus areas are:
• Supporting local entrepreneurs and businesses to thrive
• Attracting new business and investment
• Improving safety and security at the train station
• Better integration of public transport and the town centre
• Delivering residential developments on the periphery of the town centre
• Improving the public spaces and community facilities
• Providing better connections through the town centre and into Maybury Reserve 

Panmure Town Centre

Panuku Development Auckland is leading regeneration initiatives through:
• Mixed use and residential development planned around the train station
• Revitalising public spaces realm and improving community facilities
• Improving the connection from the town centre and transport hub to the Panmure Basin



Activity nodes

Activity nodes are geographic locations that support a range of activities. They have been positioned in relation to key streets or intersections, and future housing. density.

Supporting local shops

With an increase in density, the market for existing local shops and services will increase, along with the opportunity to improve their offering. We support local shops with marketing, business support programmes and funding.

Social infrastructure

Ensuring the appropriate social infrastructure exists to serve the increased population including health facilities, community facilities and early childhood education.

12.
FUTURE-PROOFING A STRONG EDUCATION STRATEGY

The Tāmaki Education Change Plan aims to deliver better education outcomes in Tāmaki, factoring in future population growth and increased demand for services. The plan takes a holistic approach to education in Tāmaki, including elements of social service and infrastructure needs, health and wellbeing, learning pathways and pedagogy, and the built environment. A significant aspect of the plan is the delivery of new education infrastructure in Tāmaki. Tāmaki Regeneration Company worked with the Ministry of Education and local schools on the Tāmaki Education Change Plan.

13.
REFLECTING THE SOCIAL HOUSING HISTORY

The character of state houses in Tāmaki contributes to the identity of the area. It shows an important social history and is a reference point for the community. The area was developed as a state housing area from 1945 onwards, and Tāmaki Regeneration Company owns many of the remaining houses. Our recent heritage study informed recommendations to guide the creation of a framework for preserving important aspects of the built character of Tāmaki, so that its unique identity is retained.

14.
SUPPORTING THE HEALTH AND WELLBEING OF THE COMMUNITY

Creating healthy communities in Tāmaki is fundamental to improving the health and wellbeing of residents. It requires a multi-faceted approach focussed on the health of our homes, neighbourhoods and environment. The focus areas are:

Healthy Homes

• All new state houses will meet 6 Homestar rating.
• Encouraging design that is responsive to the climate and various whānau
• Designing buildings that have high quality outdoor amenities for whānau living in a medium density neighbourhood.

Healthy Neighbourhoods

• Providing easy access to health facilities.
• Promoting safe and convenient transport options, with less car dependency.
• A focus on vibrant public open spaces that celebrate recreation opportunities and foster neighbourhood connections.
• Supporting both private and state housing whānau experiencing change within their neighbourhood.
• Future developments foster good neighbour relationships.
• Facilities delivered early on in a project so they’re ready to be used by local people.

Healthy Environment

• Designing neighbourhoods that respond positively to the surrounding environment.
• Supporting initiatives that lead to better environmental outcomes.
• Strengthening whānau connections to the whenua and their ancestral history.
• Supporting spiritual wellbeing through improved environmental health and ecological sustainability.